Member Article: Castle & Beckett: A Disney Fairytale

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In the “Blue Butterfly” (4×14), chanteuse Betsy Sinclair calls Castle’s and Beckett’s alter egos, Joe Flynn and Vera Mulqueen, a “walking fairytale” referring to their immediate, intense, and true love for one another. Of course, all fairytales are not necessarily romantic. For instance, the only time hearts beat faster in “Jack and the Beanstalk” and “Red Riding Hood” is when a giant and a wolf respectively chase the titular characters in the hopes of eating them, perhaps with some fava beans and nice Chianti. However, most Disney fairytales are love stories whether they feature mythical creatures, historical figures, animals, or humans. Although Castle and Beckett are flesh and bone instead of pixels and paint, and they have yet to break out into song to declare their love, they are leads in a Disney fairytale in the ways that count.

Take the Disney princesses franchise. To date there are ten of them (Merida from “Brave” has not been inducted yet). Many of them are girly girls and offend many feminists because the princesses promote gender stereotypes when they tend to their physical appearance, do domestic work without question, and collapse crying. However, in the seventy years since Cinderella debuted in 1922, the princesses have taken on more balanced ying yang characteristics and modern ones are shown as more assertive, independent, and physically strong. Beckett shares these qualities with them as well as her ass-kicking abilities with Mulan (“Mulan”), her weapon wielding skills with Rapunzel (“Tangled”), and her flowing waves with Ariel (“The Little Mermaid”) though she looks into the mirror way less than Ariel does.

The Disney princes have also changed over the years. Dawn England of Arizona State University, who has studied gender stereotypes in Disney movies, says that Disney princes and heroes are also progressively displaying more traditionally feminine qualities such as showing emotion and affection. Castle is the New Millennium Disney prince who is less leader and more laidback, relying on his wit and charm like the playboy Prince Naveen (“The Princess and the Frog”) and the cocky and a little self-centered Flynn Rider (“Tangled”). Although England’s research found that the Disney males rescued their loves more often, we know that Castle and Beckett are in a dead heat in that contest.

Castle’s and Beckett’s romance is also a more modern retelling of the Disney fairytale. In the earlier movies such as “Cinderella” and “Snow White,” the prince is taken with the princess’s beauty and she obligingly falls in love with him after just a dance or a kiss. It is in more recent films that love builds based on getting to know one another. The relationship between Castle and Beckett most closely resembles the most contemporary of the Disney fairytale romances, that of the “Tangled” two, Flynn Rider and Rapunzel, in that it starts with mistrust and proximity initiated through a little well-aimed blackmail and grows into admiration, respect and love.

All popular Disney fairytales have a wicked character as a powerful antagonist. Like Simba (“The Lion King”) and Snow White (“Snow White and the Seven Dwarves”), Castle and Beckett have also had to fight off a feline hell bent on killing them (“Cuffed” 4×10) and a beautiful woman with an evil heart (“Pandora” 4×15/ “Linchpin” 4×16). And, I have no problem with putting Dr. Josh “I save lives while my hair waves perfectly” Davidson into the villain category with Gaston (“Beauty and the Beast”) the chiseled-chinned villain who thought Belle was his to take. And now we have the hidden dragon as a major antagonist in the path of Castle’s and Beckett’s true love. Even animated Disney hasn’t come up with that one as yet.

Disney heroes and heroines also have friends with whom they exchange confidences and engage in witty repartee. Their primary role is to be there for the princess or the prince through thick and thin, cheering them up and cheering them on. Of course, unlike Lanie, Esposito and Ryan, most of the animated ones are sans opposable thumbs, ranging from crockery to assorted fauna, but they are all as loyal as our trio. They may not have taught Beckett to ice skate after she lost her mother like Thumper taught Bambi (“Bambi”) but they had her back when she went after her mother’s killers and suffered a Post Traumatic Stress Disorder meltdown. Once in a while these plucky sidekicks even save the lead’s life. Timon and Pumbaa saved Simba from a wake of circling vultures (“The Lion King”). In Beckett’s case, Ryan pulled her from the brink of death after Cole Maddox left her hanging over the side of a building in “Always” (4×23).


And who can forget the bedrock of animated Disney love stories? Magic. The Castle Beckett romance may lack pumpkins that turn into carriages or carpets that fly, but they have had their moments. There was a Cinderella moment in “Home is Where the Heart Stops” (1×07) when Martha, as the fairy godmother, gave Beckett the necklace when they were going to the ball. There was a Sleeping Beauty moment in “Cuffed” (4×10) when a poisoned needle sent Beckett off to sleep (fortunately for only a few hours – I imagine the morning breath after sleeping for a hundred years might be a bit of a mood killer).

The word “fairytale” is often used as an adjective to describe happily ever after scenarios, as in “fairy tale ending”. In this Castle’s and Beckett’s story veers slightly off course from Disney movies. In an interview with Michael Ausiello at Comic-Con 2012, Nathan Fillion said, ”I think they’ve been very clever in not treating this [Castle and Beckett getting together in the closing minutes of “Always” 4x23] as an ending to everything that has been going on, but rather this has been a protracted beginning. Now it can finally start.” As Season 5’s first episode “After the Storm” airs in a few days, here’s a video that celebrates a fairy tale beginning for our warrior princess and writer prince.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03jxvxjCPhE

About Jas

Jas is a couch potato who despairs at reality TV. When she is not watching TV, she teaches at a university in Toronto

Comments

  1. It must be fate, then, that this fairytale romance is aired on ABC, a network owned by the Disney Company.

    Nice article. Thanks for sharing. :)

  2. Great article and fantastic video! Loved it :)

  3. Honey Apostos says:

    Beautiful job Jas. It was hard not to cry.

  4. I really really love this article. Blew mi mind. Thank you for writing it!

  5. Very Nice!

    The vid was adorable.

  6. Jas… loved this article! And the video story was fantastic! :D

    (Josh = Gaston… awesome!)

  7. southerngirl says:

    Thanks so much for the article and the fairy tale video – really amazing!

  8. Wow Jas! I loved your fairy tale vid! Such universal themes of love, hope, a lesson along the way, and happily ever after. Thank you!

  9. PenguinOfTroy says:

    Wonderful article.

    Have to admit, this line made me giggle: And, I have no problem with putting Dr. Josh “I save lives while my hair waves perfectly” Davidson into the villain category…

  10. I wasn’t overly fond of Dr. Josh either (I still regret Alexis did not go medieval on him in “Rise”), but he did save Kate’s life on the operating table so we probably need to cut the man some slack. I’ve always wondered whether it was Josh or Kate who initiated the breakup. My thought is Dr. Josh would have found it difficult to be intimate with her, as he would always see her surgical scars and know he was the one who put them there. As for Kate, I suspect she came to the realization during her recovery that she was living a lie by pretending to still have feelings for him when she could not longer deny her abiding love for Castle.

    • I think that Kate initiated the break up with Josh shortly after she lied to Castle. After seeing Josh by Kate’s bedside in Rise, I think he really did care for her and wasn’t about to break up with her after the trauma she’d already gone through. Kate, however, cut herself off from not only Castle, but Lanie, Ryan, and Esposito as well. I think Josh was included in this because Kate wanted to be alone to work through everything, and she couldn’t be with him when she knew deep down that she loves Castle, too.

      The reality is that Kate never loved Josh. She realized her feelings for Castle at the end of season 2, but he broke her heart. Josh was always a placeholder, a distraction for her real feelings for Castle, and he subsequently became the punching bag of the Castle fandom. Poor guy never stood a chance. :)

  11. it is amazing how very talented the castle fans are!! thanks for sharing!

  12. Jas – What a beautiful book – you are truly amazing. THANK YOU.

    I know you will enjoy Season 5…& now the story has truly begun…& there will be a happily ever after, I know there will, you know there will…:) Let us continue to witness the most beautiful love story in a very, very long time…& maybe someday we will welcome CASTLE BABIES :) :) :) !!!